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Administrative Office of the Courts

*This article is intended for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal advice.

When you use PeopleFinders to perform a criminal records check, you may see that certain records come from the Administrative Office of the Courts or have various references to this agency. What does the Administrative Office of the Courts do, and why might you see documents reference it?

What Is the Administrative Office of the Courts?

Essentially, it’s just what it sounds like. It serves as an administrative assistant to the judicial system, ensuring that judges can rule on court cases without also having to handle the administrative work that goes along with the law.

The Administrative Office of the Courts also maintains a variety of systems that help judges, clerks, officers, news sources, and the general public to more effectively communicate with each other. For example, it prepares and submits the budget for the federal courts to Congress, allowing courts across the country to continue functioning more easily.

In addition, if you happen to encounter the judicial system, whether through research or through trial, you’ll definitely make use of the Administrative Office of the Courts. The office is what provides clerks, probation and pretrial officers, court reporters and public defenders. Plus, it applies new legislation from Congress that impacts the way in which the judicial system works.

Overall, the Administrative Office of the Courts is an incredibly important part of the legal system. By filing records and performing administrative work, it allows the court to do its work effectively.

Is the Administrative Office of the Courts Only a Federal Body?

When you refer to the Administrative Office of the Courts, it’s usually the Administrative Office of the United States Courts, a federal agency that presides over courts across the country. However, not all Administrative Office of the Courts agencies are exclusively federal agencies.

Individual states can also have their own Administrative Office of the Courts. In general, these courts are an offshoot of the federal body, working as a proxy for the federal Administrative Office of the Courts to help each individual state in a more personalized way. Many individual states utilize their Administrative Office of the Courts to deal with both civil and criminal cases more effectively.

When it comes to individual states, the Administrative Office of the Courts tends to provide support in order for each judge, clerk, officer and other officials to properly run the statewide courts. It’s very rare for a case to go to a federal court, however, so most people will only ever deal with these state courts.

Does the Administrative Office of the Courts Make All Records Available Online?

At PeopleFinders, you can find billions of criminal records for millions of American adults. One of the reasons that’s possible is because of digitized documents. Traditionally, the courts stored documents on paper, but the Administrative Office of the Courts has moved toward a simpler digital recordkeeping system.

Since 1999, the Administrative Office of the Courts has moved most of its case files to a digitized standard. That means most are now available through digital means. However, almost all cases before 1999 are still maintained on paper. Some special case files and court documents may also still be on paper. It depends on the particular case.

However, this doesn’t mean that you can just go on the Administrative Office of the Courts website and receive unlimited access to court documents. The Administrative Office of the Courts usually charges a fee for you to search for, download or print court documents and case files. Fees can range from $0.10 per page to $64 per retrieval.

How Does the Administrative Office of the Courts Affect PeopleFinders Records?

It’s important that you’re able to retrieve certain case files and court documents. After all, these criminal records can help you stay more aware of the people with whom you’re friends. But the fees associated with retrieval can be incredibly high. That’s where PeopleFinders comes in.

PeopleFinders does the legwork so you don’t have to. Instead of going to the court and paying for access to each record, you can instead obtain a membership and gain access to the billions of records that PeopleFinders offers.

Because PeopleFinders maintains its records based on a variety of sources, including records digitized by the Administrative Office of the Courts, it owes a lot to the clerks that translate real-world information into digital records. When you perform a criminal records search on someone, you’re probably accessing information that the Administrative Office of the Courts helped compile.